Curiosity

Once a child figures out how to ask questions, you’re under fire — 25 to 50 questions per hour are the norm. This drops significantly — to 2 questions per hour — once the kids get to school. The reason for this seems to be rooted in the pressure on the teachers to perform and teach very specific pieces of information.

Based on this we could introduce the idea of the level of curiosity measured by questions per hour. Since curiosity is the driving force behind learning and understanding the world, it is vital, we keep asking questions as long as we live, given the vast amount of things that want to be understood.

In Ricardo Semlers book “The seven day weekend” he talks about the importance of asking questions as well. And he tells the story of his son who asks so many questions that Mr. Semler sometimes buys him an icecream because he runs out of energy for finding answers. I think, this can make for a great rule for everyone:

Ask questions until someone buys you an icecream.

Thomas Schindler